Visual Nerve Pathway (Optical Nerve)



Optical Nerve
The optic nerve, also known as cranial nerve II, transmits visual information from the retina to the brain. Derived from the embryonic retinal ganglion cell, a diverticulum located in the diencephalon, the optic nerve does not regenerate after transection.

The optic nerve is the second of twelve paired cranial nerves but is considered to be part of the central nervous system, as it is derived from an outpouching of the diencephalon during embryonic development. As a consequence, the fibers are covered with myelin produced by oligodendrocytes, rather than Schwann cells of the peripheral nervous system, and are encased within the meninges. Peripheral neuropathies like Guillain-Barré syndrome do not affect the optic nerve.

The optic nerve is ensheathed in all three meningeal layers (dura, arachnoid, and pia mater) rather than the epineurium, perineurium, and endoneurium found in peripheral nerves. Fiber tracts of the mammalian central nervous system (as opposed to the peripheral nervous system) are incapable of regeneration, and, hence, optic nerve damage produces irreversible blindness. The fibres from the retina run along the optic nerve to nine primary visual nuclei in the brain, from which a major relay inputs into the primary visual cortex.








Looking for tutor?
Try here

Are you tutor?
Just add your details and get your personal web page absolutely free !!

Others will be able to find you, teaching is a great help

Register As Tutor

Daily new topic
If we are interested to learn many things then there is only one way; it is early and continuous learning.

Here you will find daily one new interesting topic for your knowledge needs.

We should know many topics, so we can correlate our learning, view and imagination.

Be ready for tomorrow.